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Prevent Dropout with an Early Warning System

Early Warning Systems

photo of five graduates in their cap and gowns.The high school dropout problem in the United States has been called a national crisis. About 25% of all high school students leave the public school system before graduating (Snyder & Dillow, 2011). Early warning systems (EWS) use readily available school data to identify students who are at risk of dropping out, allowing educators to intervene early.

Schools can use information from an early warning system to support students who are at risk of dropping out with both school-wide strategies and targeted interventions. Districts and schools can use early warning system data to examine school-level patterns in the current school year and over time, in order to address systemic issues that may be impeding a student’s ability to graduate.

Learn More About Early Warning Systems

Implementation
Learn about the Early Warning Intervention and Monitoring System (EWIMS) implementation process, which involves a complete cycle for EWS implementation at the school or district level. This seven-step process helps schools and districts systematically: 1) identify students who are showing signs that they are at risk of dropping out of high school; 2) match these students to interventions to get them back on track for graduation; and 3) monitor students' progress in those interventions.

Early Warning System High School Tool
Download the National High School Center's Early Warning System High School Tool and supporting documents.

Early Warning System Middle Grades Tool
Download the National High School Center'sEarly Warning System Middle Grades Tool and supporting documents.


If you have been using or are interested in our EWS resources, a new website has been created (http://www.earlywarningsystems.org) for this purpose, and if you are looking for additional support and services, please email us at earlywarning@air.org

 

 

Snyder, T.D., & Dillow, S.A. (2011). Digest of education statistics 2010 (NCES 2011-015). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.